Signed in Blood

I pulled an overflowing menstrual cup out and spilled a gush of blood at my feet. It’s heavier than usual, and I’m quick to blame the supermoon, the closest the moon has been in my lifetime.

I had my dip pen ready, and a scrap of paper to practice writing on. I received a request to sign a Lilith: Queen of the Demons paperback in menstrual blood. It’s a brilliant idea. I can’t believe I didn’t think of it before.

Lilith: Queen of the Demons paperback signed in menstrual blood by May Ling Su

My blood was surprisingly watery. I worried that it wouldn’t be dark enough to sufficiently make a mark. It looked thick and clotty at the bottom of the cup so I poured a bit of it out, but it yielded the same consistency on the page.

I decided to trust it. My blood has never let me down. It showed up whenever I painted on paper or on my skin. I held the page open with a paperweight till it dried a darker red. Now I have a Lilith: Queen of the Demons book signed in supermoon blood going out in the mail tomorrow.

Dip pen in #supermoon #blood and sign #Lilith #book. Hope I didn’t just make a horcrux. #onmyperiod

A photo posted by May Ling Su (@maylingsu) on

I joke about having possibly made a horcrux out of a Lilith: Queen of the Demons book signed with supermoon blood, but to be honest, I feel a deep loss from having to let go off such an intimate part of me. This book is now more magical than ever. Cherish it well, you who will receive it. Part of the moon and me will be in it always.

May Ling Su raises her menstrual cup to life. Cheers!

Cheers!

Super Blood Moon

Super Blood Moon 27 September 2015

What a spectacle Mother Nature treated us to on Sunday night. We built a fire in the backyard, got sleeping bags out on the lawn and watched the super moon get totally eclipsed and turn red. I felt a personal connection to her, as close as could be and bleeding beautifully for us. So like a woman.

Now if only the rest of the world would celebrate menstruation the way they celebrate the Super Blood Moon. Here are a handful of links to what the world thinks of menstruation:

The U.N. is still afraid of the “M” word. It’s 2015, and the U.N.’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals still only alludes to addressing the needs of menstruating girls and women. We’ve only been menstruating for the entire history of human existence. How about a source of clean water and a private place to wash ourselves and our linens in?

Swedish teens’ menstruation-theme photo goes viral after principal bans it from high school yearbook. When will grown-ups learn? Banning something is the best way to have a global news article explode in your face. Also, the kids used fake blood, no different from a Halloween costume. Nervous much?

Women around the world are challenging menstruation stigma. This article is an excellent wrap up of current events that bring the topic of menstruation front and center in the public consciousness.

Menstruation 101 for Men. Or a refresher course, depending on your knowledge and level of experience.

“Period Barbie” misses the target. Let’s start with the target user: girls approaching menstruation, approximately 10 to 15 years old. I don’t want to generalize, and if you or someone you know is an exception, more power to you, but I don’t personally know any girl this age who still plays with dolls. And I know because my daughter falls in this age bracket. (My husband, on the other hand, loves dolls. Go figure.) So if you want to look like an idiot in front of your tween, like the parents in their ad, then you’re the target market for the Lammily Period Party doll. Or you can just be real, communicate openly and honestly, so that your daughters can trust you to be a supportive resource for information about all the physical and social changes that are about to take place.