Super Blood Moon

Super Blood Moon 27 September 2015

What a spectacle Mother Nature treated us to on Sunday night. We built a fire in the backyard, got sleeping bags out on the lawn and watched the super moon get totally eclipsed and turn red. I felt a personal connection to her, as close as could be and bleeding beautifully for us. So like a woman.

Now if only the rest of the world would celebrate menstruation the way they celebrate the Super Blood Moon. Here are a handful of links to what the world thinks of menstruation:

The U.N. is still afraid of the “M” word. It’s 2015, and the U.N.’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals still only alludes to addressing the needs of menstruating girls and women. We’ve only been menstruating for the entire history of human existence. How about a source of clean water and a private place to wash ourselves and our linens in?

Swedish teens’ menstruation-theme photo goes viral after principal bans it from high school yearbook. When will grown-ups learn? Banning something is the best way to have a global news article explode in your face. Also, the kids used fake blood, no different from a Halloween costume. Nervous much?

Women around the world are challenging menstruation stigma. This article is an excellent wrap up of current events that bring the topic of menstruation front and center in the public consciousness.

Menstruation 101 for Men. Or a refresher course, depending on your knowledge and level of experience.

“Period Barbie” misses the target. Let’s start with the target user: girls approaching menstruation, approximately 10 to 15 years old. I don’t want to generalize, and if you or someone you know is an exception, more power to you, but I don’t personally know any girl this age who still plays with dolls. And I know because my daughter falls in this age bracket. (My husband, on the other hand, loves dolls. Go figure.) So if you want to look like an idiot in front of your tween, like the parents in their ad, then you’re the target market for the Lammily Period Party doll. Or you can just be real, communicate openly and honestly, so that your daughters can trust you to be a supportive resource for information about all the physical and social changes that are about to take place.